Lucasfilm

By now you may have heard that Disney bought Lucasfilm. Incidentally that means they get Star Wars, Indiana Jones and Howard the Duck. It also means they get Lucasarts, the game studio that brought us Monkey Island, X-Wing, Day of the Tentacle and all the other wonderful games from your youth. Oh, and they’re making Star Wars Episode 7, due 2015.

Absorbing the initial brunt of the shock that Lucas would ever sell the darling cow he’s been milking for all these years, this may not all be bad. Sure, Disney’s track record for big franchises is spotty, recently with John Carter, but it may still be a good home for Lucasfilm. After all, the Star Wars movies went downhill by the middle of Episode 6 anyway, so by the time Episode 7 comes, no matter how bad it’ll be, there’s no telling if it would’ve been better off headed by George Lucas himself.

To me, what happens to Star Wars is not the thing I care about the most in todays news. I’ve always thought that what came out of Star Wars other than the movies, was more interesting. Perhaps you didn’t enjoy Episode 1, but it’s hard to fault the music. It’s also possible you cringed your feet in Episode 2, but there’s a good chance you played a Lucasarts Star Wars game and enjoyed it a fair bit. In fact, the stories in the expanded Star Wars universe have always fascinated me more than the movies themselves. How do you build a lightsaber again? Oh, and did I mention the wonderful Ralph McQuarrie and Doug Chiang art?

There’s also Indiana Jones, probably my favorite thing to come out of Lucasfilm. Heck, I even enjoyed the fourth one, and I was certainly looking forward to 5. Unfortunately, that may not be in the cards anymore:

While the Indiana Jones franchise wasn’t mentioned much, Disney did say that though it now owns the rights, there might not be any new films because of potential hurdles with Indiana Jones distributor Paramount.

Even worse news for Lucasarts fans:

Disney CEO Robert Iger briefly discussed Disney’s plans for game development using the intellectual properties acquired in the acquisition, saying, “We’re likely to focus more on social and mobile than we are on console. We’ll look opportunistically at console, most likely in licensing rather than publishing, but we think that given the nature of these characters and how well known they are, and the storytelling, that they lend themselves quite nicely, as they’ve already demonstrated to the other platforms.”

It’s impossible to tell whether George Lucas, had he kept the family business, would’ve seen the light and restored Lucasarts to its former glory, in fact it’s probably unlikely. But there were plans for Indy 5, which I would’ve very much loved to see. So if you’re fans of either of those, it seems todays news wasn’t a new hope.

Responses to “Lucasfilm”

  1. James says:

    To be honest, John Carter wasn’t that bad of a film, it was just marketed poorly. I wouldn’t mind seeing a fresh take and feel like that being brought to the Star Wars universe (with better marketing of course).

    • Joen says:

      Oh don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed John Carter, and want several sequels.

      The problem is Disney saw it as a failure, so sequels are probably off the table.

  2. Hew says:

    Two words: Thrawn trilogy.

    Make it happen, Joen. Make it happen.

  3. zack mandell says:

    It will be fascinating to see were the series goes from here. Let’s hope that they can do the series justice. Taking on Star Wars is not like taking a book and making a movie from it. They are taking something that is already vastly popular and continuing it. This can be a difficult thing for any industry to do.

    • Joen says:

      In fact so true that arguably George Lucas himself had a problem following up on the original trilogy.

      I enjoyed 2 and 3, but not as much as 4 5 and 6.

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