Twenty Fourteen, The Magazine Theme

With Twenty Thirteen well out the door, the next default WordPress theme is already being hammered on. Previously a WordPress.com premium theme, Further is being used as the base. Like Twenty Thirteen, it uses Genericons, so recoloring the theme should be a breeze. For the past couple of years, Takashi has blown me away with his theming skills, so I couldn’t be happier with the choice. Check out Twenty Fourteen as it looks today: it’s going to improve even more over the course of development!

Twenty Thirteen: Make It Yours

WordPress 3.6 was released today. With it, the Twenty Thirteen theme into which we’ve poured much energy. One aspect that was particularly important to me, when designing the theme, was to encourage users to customize the theme to their liking. For the very same reason, every icon in Twenty Thirteen is an easily recolorable icon-font glyph. So changing the whole color scheme is basically writing some CSS.

To celebrate the occasion, I made a couple of color themes you can install on your Twenty Thirteen blog.

2013 Green

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Green is my favorite color these days. Did you know when danish people have their final high school exams, they sit at a green table, because green has a calming effect on your mind? It’s true. I tried it.

Get 2013 Green (preview)

2013 Green Sequence

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Twenty Thirteen has emphasis on blogging, and post backgrounds are assigned based on post formats. If you don’t use post formats, but want the colors of Twenty Thirteen, get this one — it’ll simply alternate the background colors sequentially.

Get 2013 Green Sequence (preview)

2013 Blue

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I actually threw in a shade of pink, or “salmon”, in this blue mix. So it’s not entirely shades of sky blue, but I guess you could not use the “status” post format if you dislike salmon. Or you could customize it and make it your own!

Get 2013 Blue (preview)

2013 Blue Sequence

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If you really don’t like salmon but do want an alternating post-format-free blue theme, you’ll want to get this one and customize it. Or you could embrace the salmon. Smoked. On toast. With salt and pepper.

Get 2013 Blue Sequence (preview)

2013 Orange Sequence

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Having made sequence versions of blue and green, it seems unfair not to complete the triad. So here’s Orange Sequence — that’s the default Twenty Thirteen color scheme, but the colorful post backgrounds are assigned regardless of post format.

Get 2013 Orange Sequence (preview)

How To?

These are child themes. That means they’re WordPress themes that require a parent theme to be present, in this case Twenty Thirteen. So these themes will only work if you also have Twenty Thirteen installed. If you’re on WordPress 3.6 or higher, Twenty Thirteen is preinstalled.

More Options

One of the best things about open source is that you can modify things to your liking, and even redistribute.

Please do so. Make it your own, and share it back.

I would like nothing more than to see you modify and redistribute any of the above child themes. So much, in fact, that if you’d like to re-color the default Twenty Thirteen header, I’ve made you this PSD so you can easily do just that.

Now go play with some colors!

Jony’s iOS 7

Back in October last year, Scott Forstall was replaced by Jony Ive, and I asked the question: did iOS just get interesting again? Last night we found out, and the answer is yes.

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There’s a lot to like about the new iOS 7. As a whole, the result looks mostly unique. There’s a nice clean aesthetic going with the thin Helvetica, the white UI chrome, the sandblasted layers and the almost complete absence of gaudy textures. It’s also colorful. Which is a good thing. Right?

Leading up to this there were jungle-drums touting how flat the new UI was going to look (as though every UI will suddenly be clean and uncluttered if you just run it over with a bulldozer). Fortunately that’s not what happened. Don’t get me wrong: I do like my UIs to be clean and simple, I just find the term “flat” to be mostly meaningless when applied to design. There are no magic bullets, there’s only good design and bad design, and I think Jony Ive gets that. So instead of trumpeting flat, Apple trumpeted true simplicity. Oh, and grid-based icons:

Sure, there’s certainly a grid there. I was mostly paying attention to the light-source for those gradients, though: why does Phone looks embossed while Mail looks inset? Also: Game Center? Again?

There will be no tears shed for the linen texture. I will not mourn the loss of green felt. Still, the new iconography alone makes iOS 7 such a departure that there’s bound to be some learning curve, which begs the question: why didn’t they go further now they were at it?

They had a real opportunity here. Jony could’ve said to his team:

Team! We’ve dominated the smartphone market for the last 5 years with a grid of round-rect icons. How do we re-think it from the ground up for the next decade? How do we create something that’ll make Samsung scramble to copy us again?

Perhaps they did just that. Conceivably they created giant mood-boards. Maybe they decorated hip little cubicles with smiling model faces and photos of subway signs and collages of differently colored post-it notes. Could be they brain-stormed all the places they see the mobile space go in the next ten years: creepy glasses, holographic watches, voice-controlled smart underwear. No doubt they considered the convergence of the cloud with all these new-fangled features. Perchance they arrived right back at a grid of icons: Eureka! We had it right all along!

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I hope that’s not the case. I hope they had grander ideas… post-smartphone ideas. I’m hoping they were just so lazer-focused on shipping on time they had to punt their ideas for replacing Springboard. I’m hoping Jony felt the most important thing was to uproot the old linen-clad ways and set out a strong new direction for all future Apple UIs. I want to believe.

I want to believe that maybe one day we’ll have smartphones whose strongest visual cues aren’t defined by the graphical prowess of 3rd party icon designers. I want to believe that maybe one day we’ll look back at websites that use confirm() to alert us of their mobile apps as a dark age. I want to believe that maybe one day it’ll be possible to avoid all social interaction in a manner more impressive than tapping in and out of apps. Is that so much to ask?

WordPress is 10

On June 21st 2004, I switched this blog from Movable Type to WordPress 1.2. I was living in a rented loft in Copenhagen and worked on Flash games as my day job.

9 years later and I have a little girl, I live in Suburbia (on purpose), and I designed a WordPress default theme. All of that in no small part thanks to WordPress and open source software. Pretty happy I made that switch in 2004.

Happy birthday, WordPress, here’s to 10 more. Oh, and go say hi to the founder, I had a hand in his new site.

Four Little Numbers

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Twenty Thirteen, the theme I designed with Konstantin and Lance is now on WordPress.com, and will soon be the default theme of WordPress 3.6.

Designing Twenty Thirteen has been a pretty remarkable experience, mainly because I got to work with such an amazing community. There’s nothing to temper a theme into shape like hundreds of people submitting patches. It’s as much a privilege as it is a learning experience and the design has changed so much since my initial mockups, all for the better. Here’s how it all started.

Brief

Through machinations I have not yet fully understood, an invitation to design a new default WordPress theme landed in my lap at the end of 2012. After an ensuing song and dance show with no-one watching, the reality of the situation slowly descended on me. My motto for the next couple of months was the Litany of Fear from Dune.

The overarching vision for the theme that Matt had set out, was a focus on blogging, and great support for post formats. On top of that, we wanted a colorful, warm and friendly vibe. That plus total creative freedom was pretty much the extent of the direction given. Blue skies are both daunting and exhilerating.

Keeping those core values in mind, I started creating palettes, picking fonts, and drawing shapes.

Note: It’s important to understand that there’s a new Twenty theme every year, and one goal is to be different from the year before. Twenty Twelve is CMS oriented and features a squeaky clean codebase. Twenty Thirteen is focused on the blog, putting your reverse chronological post stream front and center. Will next year be a CMS theme again? Perhaps; I personally cannot wait to see what will be created for Twenty Fourteen.

Design

It was quite a relief that the theme didn’t have to be anything like the previous Twenties. After all, Twenty Twelve is still a fantastic theme. It’s current and it’s wonderful, and the year-naming of the Twenty themes (unlike with Microsoft Office) does not indicate “newer or better” — just: different. This gave me the freedom to explore a bunch of ideas, including dropdown menu widget areas, multi-column posts, crazy abstract headers, tiled galleries, large pictures, huge fonts and bold colors. Some of those initial ideas survived, others were tempered by reality.

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Post formats

Posts are posts, right? Sure, but what if there were special layouts that were tailormade to different types of content? That’s the genesis of post formats in WordPress, and the feature is getting a huge bump in the upcoming 3.6 release. With Twenty Thirteen, we wanted to hook into that new ecosystem, and encourage the use of different post formats to better highlight a variety of content. So I spent a great deal of time trying to find a pattern for each post format: what does a “status update” look like? Let me tell, you, I have stacks of paper sketches — many of them angrily crossed out, some of them so quickly jotted down they’re barely readable anymore.

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In the end the key to cracking the design was assigning a color swatch to each format. You’d be able to create your own alternating tapestry of colors.

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The mockups were quite interesting and difficult to do, because a zoomed out view of such a tapestry of posts doesn’t do the overall design justice. You have to zoom in 1:1 and watch the colors change as you scroll down the page — like how users will see it. Scrolling becomes almost magaziney.

Icon Font

One aspect of theme design that becomes much more difficult when a wide range of background colors is used, is iconography. Icons for comments, tags, categories etc, are usually PNG files. The problem with that is that you bake the icon color into the graphic file, making it necessary to create a rather large stack of different-colored icon files in order to ensure contrast on all background colors. Since we wanted it to be super easy for users to change the default Twenty Thirteen color scheme if they wanted to, PNG files weren’t ever going to be an option. Fortunately I was allowed to release an icon font I’d created for WordPress.com, and use that. The result, Genericons, is a free and GPL icon font full of symbols that are useful for WordPress themes. I hope to see it in use far beyond Twenty Thirteen, because it’s just so wonderful to be able to add colors, drop shadows or even CSS animation to fully resizable symbols, compared to dealing with PNGs.

Header

With a tapestry of alternating colors, how does a header fit in? The answer was to treat the header like we treated post format backgrounds: have the background illustration full size, regardless of browser width, cropped if seen on a mobile device. This made the header a decorative element and part of the tapestry. As for the contents of the header, I explored abstract color shapes, flat and simple like the post backgrounds themselves.

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Here’s a video of me creating one of the headers in Photoshop:

Here’s a fun header that didn’t make it:

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Speaking of kooky, one way to create a warm vibe, I find, is to not take everything too seriously. So we put little tweaks here and there to hopefully make you smile. The 404 page is an example.

Make Your Own Kind Of Music

Twenty Thirteen is not for everyone — it’s for colorful blogs with a variety of content. If you’re into that, I really hope that you’ll enjoy using Twenty Thirteen. I hope you’ll customize it, re-color it, hack it and make it your own. In fact at some point in the not too distant future, I’d like to release a couple of alternate color schemes and templates to get you started. This is not the end.

It’s been such a privilege to work on this theme, and I thank Matt and the community for not only giving me the opportunity, but for embracing the colors and shapes I concocted. Probably the greatest privilege of all was to work directly with Lance Willet and Konstantin Obenland, my partners in crime. These guys took my mockups and made them sing. Seeing the theme come together was like magic. A design is just an idea, but for ideas to become real they need to meet with reality with all that entails. Lance and Konstantin were supportive and they understood and appreciated what we were trying to do, and for the work they did (and are still doing) they have my undying admiration. I’m tremendously proud to have my name listed next to them in the great halls of the Twenty theme developers. It’s a bucket-list item I never thought I’d be able to check. So thanks so much for that.